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Game History

2018 Power Up

FIRST® Power Up, the competition game for the 2018 season, had a retro 8-bit theme. The aim of the game was to place power cubes, which are essentially just milk crates, on balancing scales to earn points. Alliances were able to exchange power cubes for power ups to give them a short-term advantage. At the end of the match, robots could climb on a bar on the central scale platform to "face the boss" and receive an extra ranking point.


Our first competition, New England District Granite State Event, we had a record of 7-7-0 and had a final rank of 12. We made it all the way to the quarter-finals and won the Judges’ Award. This success continued with our second event, New England District UNH Event, with a record of 10-5-1, a final rank of 10 and taking part in the semi-finals. We earned the Innovation in Control Award Sponsored by Rockwell Automation for our creative use of LiDAR in our robot. These triumphs allowed for us to qualify for the New England District Championship in Boston, Massachusetts. We performed well; we were 20th in the rankings and had a record of 8-4-0. Our most notable achievement was our win in the Safety Award, sponsored by Underwriters Laboratory. After coming runner-up in the previous two competitions, the award helped us to qualify for the World Championship held in Detroit, Michigan. We competed in the Tesla division and finished the official season with a final rank of 41 out of 67 and a record of 5-5-0.

2017 Steamworks

FIRST® choose the theme Steampunk for 2017, and this was the first year that FIRST® would host two Championship events for one season. The game  was very oriented around rank points rather than the raw points scored. Most teams had the end-all goal of having all of their rotors spinning as quickly as possible, to achieve a high enough kPa (kilopascal, which is a unit of pressure), through fuel, to climb at the end of the match. We knew the top alliances would have all rotors spinning—the kPa bonus—and be able to climb; we wanted to be on that alliance. Compromises were made throughout the season, but, ultimately, an appropriately named robot, “Zeppelin”, emerged from the shop, fully equipped to collect gears from a human player from any angle, deliver them to the pilot with ease, collect 50+ fuel, score them with vision assist, and then quickly climb the rope at the end for takeoff!


The Force Team made it into the semifinals at the New England District Granite State Event, and then went onto be the winner at the New England District Southern New Hampshire Event. In addition to the win, the team earned the Industrial Design and Safety Awards. Qualifying for the New England District Championship held at UNH, we competed there and won as the second alliance partner. Then, qualifying for the World Championship, the team received tons of community support, allowing us to be able to attend. The team competed at the Championship in St. Louis in the Carson division, resulting as a Championship Subdivision Finalist. In the Off-Season, the team competed at several other events, reaching semifinals and finals in many of them.

2017 Steamworks

FIRST® choose the theme Steampunk for 2017, and this was the first year that FIRST® would host two Championship events for one season. The game  was very oriented around rank points rather than the raw points scored. Most teams had the end-all goal of having all of their rotors spinning as quickly as possible, to achieve a high enough kPa (kilopascal, which is a unit of pressure), through fuel, to climb at the end of the match. We knew the top alliances would have all rotors spinning—the kPa bonus—and be able to climb; we wanted to be on that alliance. Compromises were made throughout the season, but, ultimately, an appropriately named robot, “Zeppelin”, emerged from the shop, fully equipped to collect gears from a human player from any angle, deliver them to the pilot with ease, collect 50+ fuel, score them with vision assist, and then quickly climb the rope at the end for takeoff!


The Force Team made it into the semifinals at the New England District Granite State Event, and then went onto be the winner at the New England District Southern New Hampshire Event. In addition to the win, the team earned the Industrial Design and Safety Awards. Qualifying for the New England District Championship held at UNH, we competed there and won as the second alliance partner. Then, qualifying for the World Championship, the team received tons of community support, allowing us to be able to attend. The team competed at the Championship in St. Louis in the Carson division, resulting as a Championship Subdivision Finalist. In the Off-Season, the team competed at several other events, reaching semifinals and finals in many of them.

2016 Stronghold

FIRST® introduced the first themed game in and game field for FIRST® Robotics Competitions in 2016, displaying them in a full video teaser in the autumn. The challenge was for robots to overcome physical defenses on the field and storm the opposing alliance’s castle with boulders. Rank points, in addition to match points, were critical for ranking high, and The Force Team decided to ensure the robot had a skilled defense, while still maintaining the capability of also taking the tower down.

 

We made it into the quarterfinals at the New England District North Shore Event, and at the New England District Boston Event. Since the team had not competed at Worlds since 2010, we were waitlisted and received an invitation. The team was elected to attend the World Championship in St. Louis, competing in the Curie Division, and re-learn the excitement and inspiration that comes along with the trip.

2015 Recycle Rush

Recycle Rush was the theme of 2015, where the alliances weren’t necessarily competing against each other, but against the top score at the event, marking the return of Coopertition™, the philosophy that teams should help and cooperate with others as the compete.

 

Utilizing our pneumatics in a controlled and creative way alongside a Mecanum drive, our robot maneuvered smoothly on the carpeted field and made stacks effortlessly. Nasus, our robot, made it into the Semi-Finals at the New England District Reading Event, and the Quarter Finals at the New England District Northeastern University Event. The Force Team also competed at the New England FIRST® District Championship in Worcester, Massachusetts.

2015 Recycle Rush

Recycle Rush was the theme of 2015, where the alliances weren’t necessarily competing against each other, but against the top score at the event, marking the return of Coopertition™, the philosophy that teams should help and cooperate with others as the compete.

 

Utilizing our pneumatics in a controlled and creative way alongside a Mecanum drive, our robot maneuvered smoothly on the carpeted field and made stacks effortlessly. Nasus, our robot, made it into the Semi-Finals at the New England District Reading Event, and the Quarter Finals at the New England District Northeastern University Event. The Force Team also competed at the New England FIRST® District Championship in Worcester, Massachusetts.

2014 Aerial Assist

This was the first year that New Hampshire was within the district model of New England, ending the Granite State Regional. The 2014 game, Aerial Assist, was about scoring points using two foot diameter balls into long high goals spanning the width of the field above the drivers' stations. There were also two small floor-based goals per alliance in each corner of the field.

 

The team competed at the UNH District Event and earned the Industrial Design Award. We went onto compete at the Northeastern University District Event, making it to the semifinals and earning the Judges' Award. Qualifying for the New England FIRST® Robotics Competition Region Championship, Team 1073 ranked 13th and was eliminated in the quarter finals. We were only one invite away from qualifying for the World Championship.

2013 Ultimate Ascent

The 2013 game, Ultimate Ascent, challenged teams to build a robot that could launch discs into goals, all at varying heights. Teams had four goals to aim at—including high, medium, low, and pyramid goals. The end game of Ultimate Ascent required teams to climb a ten foot tall pyramid.

With the help of Ursa Major, The Force Team won the Judges' Award at the Granite State Regional.

 

Eventually, the climbing mechanism was redesigned, becoming less fierce, but the team still remembered its original form fondly.

2013 Ultimate Ascent

The 2013 game, Ultimate Ascent, challenged teams to build a robot that could launch discs into goals, all at varying heights. Teams had four goals to aim at—including high, medium, low, and pyramid goals. The end game of Ultimate Ascent required teams to climb a ten foot tall pyramid.

With the help of Ursa Major, The Force Team won the Judges' Award at the Granite State Regional.

 

Eventually, the climbing mechanism was redesigned, becoming less fierce, but the team still remembered its original form fondly.

2012 Rebound Rubble

The 2012 game challenged teams to design robots to shoot foam basketballs into hoops at varying heights and to balance on a "see-saw"-styled bridge. Alliances had four baskets to shoot balls into, each with a backboard outlined in retroreflective tape. For the endgame, the robots from the same alliance had to balance on their team's bridge for alliance points or two robots from opposing alliances could balance on the center bridge for Coopertition™ points.

 

With the help of our robot, Libra, the team competed at the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, then continued on to win the Judges' Award at the Northeast Utilities FIRST® Connecticut Regional, and was ultimately in the winning alliance at the Off-Season competition Mayhem in Merrimack.

2011 Logo Motion

In 2011, the game required the robots to pick up tubes and hang them on pegs at either extremity of the field, obscuring the vision of the drive-team. There were three levels of pegs, each level worth one more point than the previous. For the endgame, the robots had fifteen seconds to race to a pole and deploy mini-bots to race to the top!

 

We competed at the BAE Systems Granite State Regional and earned the Dr. Woodie Flowers Award for our head mentor. At Northeast Utilities FIRST® Connecticut Regional we earned the Finalist award. During Off-Season Team 1073 placed first at Battlecry @ WPI, Mayhem in Merrimack, and at River Rage.

2011 Logo Motion

In 2011, the game required the robots to pick up tubes and hang them on pegs at either extremity of the field, obscuring the vision of the drive-team. There were three levels of pegs, each level worth one more point than the previous. For the endgame, the robots had fifteen seconds to race to a pole and deploy mini-bots to race to the top!

 

We competed at the BAE Systems Granite State Regional and earned the Dr. Woodie Flowers Award for our head mentor. At Northeast Utilities FIRST® Connecticut Regional we earned the Finalist award. During Off-Season Team 1073 placed first at Battlecry @ WPI, Mayhem in Merrimack, and at River Rage.

2010 Breakaway

In 2010, The Force Team competed in a game analogous to soccer named Breakaway. The robots had to play offense by kicking soccer balls into corner goals, or play defense by blocking goals and slowing down cycles.

 

With our alliance partners, Teams 1519 and 1058, we won the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, qualifying the team to attend the World Championship. We also competed at the Hartford Regional in Connecticut, and used that event to train an alternate drive-team. In addition to the winning success on the field, 1073 earned the Coopertition™, Motorola Quality, and a Dr. Woodie Flowers Award from the Granite State Regional Competition. We went on to place well in the Newton Field of the World Championship in Atlanta, Georgia.

2009 Lunacy

This year, the game required robots collect “moon rocks” and place them in "trailers" with vision targets that were attached to other robots. The field had a low-friction surface called "regolith," a material that simulated the effects of the moon's gravity.

 

The Force Team competed at both the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire and the Hartford Regional Competition in Hartford, Connecticut. This was also the first year that the team attended BattleCry @ WPI in Worcester, Massachusetts. At all competitions, we made it into the quarter-finals, giving the team a new boost of energy and a taste of success.

2009 Lunacy

This year, the game required robots collect “moon rocks” and place them in "trailers" with vision targets that were attached to other robots. The field had a low-friction surface called "regolith," a material that simulated the effects of the moon's gravity.

 

The Force Team competed at both the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire and the Hartford Regional Competition in Hartford, Connecticut. This was also the first year that the team attended BattleCry @ WPI in Worcester, Massachusetts. At all competitions, we made it into the quarter-finals, giving the team a new boost of energy and a taste of success.

2008 Overdrive

Overdrive was a race, in which the robots had to be fast and handle corners well. While doing that, they also needed to manipulate a large ball, similar to the game in 2004. This robot used engineering concepts taught in the high school classes, such as 4 bar linkages, and contributed many broken parts to the team's collection of lessons learned. 

 

Despite falling short of the tournament rounds at the Granite State Regional Competition, the team made a strong show with a fast, high-torque drive train.

2008 Overdrive

Overdrive was a race, in which the robots had to be fast and handle corners well. While doing that, they also needed to manipulate a large ball, similar to the game in 2004. This robot used engineering concepts taught in the high school classes, such as 4 bar linkages, and contributed many broken parts to the team's collection of lessons learned. 

 

Despite falling short of the tournament rounds at the Granite State Regional Competition, the team made a strong show with a fast, high-torque drive train.

2007 Rack 'n Roll

This year’s game required the robots to reach up to place game pieces, a task we had avoided until this time due to concerns on how to balance the robot. The robots had to place inflated inner tubes on a tiered round rack in the center of the field to score points.

 

We had a superb drive-team that brought The Force Team into the final round at the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire. We also earned the Entrepreneurial Award at this event, a token to the strong re-branding of the team!

2007 Rack 'n Roll

This year’s game required the robots to reach up to place game pieces, a task we had avoided until this time due to concerns on how to balance the robot. The robots had to place inflated inner tubes on a tiered round rack in the center of the field to score points.

 

We had a superb drive-team that brought The Force Team into the final round at the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire. We also earned the Entrepreneurial Award at this event, a token to the strong re-branding of the team!

2006 Aim High

This was a historical year for FIRST®, as it was the first game to ever have projectiles. The Force Team more than doubled in size, going from twenty to thirty freshmen rookies. This was very difficult to manage, and the team worked to keep morale high with humor and pizza.

 

These new members and our robot, Don't Panic, helped us place into the quarter-finals at the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire. Continuing the transitional period with the new leadership and the influx of students, the team aesthetic morphed to include both lightsabers, representing the Star Wars theme of our name, and rapiers, for the school’s cavalier mascot.

2006 Aim High

This was a historical year for FIRST®, as it was the first game to ever have projectiles. The Force Team more than doubled in size, going from twenty to thirty freshmen rookies. This was very difficult to manage, and the team worked to keep morale high with humor and pizza.

 

These new members and our robot, Don't Panic, helped us place into the quarter-finals at the Granite State Regional Competition in Manchester, New Hampshire. Continuing the transitional period with the new leadership and the influx of students, the team aesthetic morphed to include both lightsabers, representing the Star Wars theme of our name, and rapiers, for the school’s cavalier mascot.

2005 Triple Play

This year was a year of change for The Force Team, as the founder moved away and the newly hired high school technology teacher joined the team as our head mentor. With the new leadership came a transitional period, and the team wanted to become involved with the school. Rebranding from orange to blue, the team could be seen sporting home-made blue and white tye-dyed shirts.

We competed at the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, earning the Safety Award.

2005 Triple Play

This year was a year of change for The Force Team, as the founder moved away and the newly hired high school technology teacher joined the team as our head mentor. With the new leadership came a transitional period, and the team wanted to become involved with the school. Rebranding from orange to blue, the team could be seen sporting home-made blue and white tye-dyed shirts.

We competed at the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, earning the Safety Award.

2004 Frenzy

Our highly trained human players managed to win us one of the highest scoring matches at Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire. They were a strong part of the team and tirelessly practiced in the school's mini-gym for this event.

2004 FIRST Frenzy

This 2v2 game used two different game pieces comprising of 13in balls and 30in balls. There was a line-following autonomous to release the 13in balls onto the field early, and the game featured a climbing endgame. The smaller game pieces were scored by human players who were fed by robots, while the larger game pieces were scored (or de-scored in our case) by robots. Our highly trained human players managed to win us one of the highest scoring matches at Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire. They were a strong part of the team and tirelessly practiced in the school's mini-gym for this event.

2003 Stack Attack

Our bright orange colors certainly helped us stand out at events and within our school and community. We were more than excited to break into the world of FIRST®.

The Force Team was a “force” to be reckoned during our first season. We competed at the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, earning the Rookie All-Star Award and Website award.

2003 Stack Attack

In this game, robots had to stack bins, knock over other team's stacks, and climb a ramp at the end of the match. There was a low bar that robots could drive under to circumvent the ramp entirely to reach the other side of the field, something Enforcer was famous for. Our bright orange colors certainly helped us stand out at events and within our school and community. We were more than excited to break into the world of FIRST®.

The Force Team was a “force” to be reckoned during our first season. We competed at the Granite State Regional in Manchester, New Hampshire, earning the Rookie All-Star Award and Website award.